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Entries about extreme weather

Hailstorm in the heat of August...!

Budapest


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The morning started the sight of a boat in the shape of a sightseeing bus going down the Danube...

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...it continued with the poignant sight of the 'Shoes on the Danube' sculpture. This consists of lots of metal shoes right on the edge of the river; this is in memory of the Hungarian Jews who were shot and thrown into the river by the fascist Arrow Cross Militia in 1944.

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After I crossed the bridge I waited quite a long time for the funicular up the side of Castle Hill. Once I got to the top, I took some photos of the wonderful view and then went in search of the Golden Eagle Pharmacy Museum.

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The Golden Eagle Pharmacy Museum is on the site of Budapest's first apothecary, dating from 1681. I found it easily and had a look round - it was small but interesting, with books of medicinal plants dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, an 18th century book about the preparation of medicines, ceramic jars used as water, spice and medicinal plant holders, a preserved human head, a preserved bat and 18th century pharmacy equipment such as scales, a microscope, distilling equipment and strangely shaped glass tubes.

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Then I went on to the Hungarian National Gallery, but before I went inside I noticed an archery stand outside, so I had a go on that; I got a bullseye, which won me five extra arrows. When I finished, the chap in charge asked me if I had a bow at home! For a second I was confused because with his thick accent, I though he was asking if I had a ball at home. I was really hot and sweaty by now so I had a very tasty and refreshing iced coffee from a stand nearby.

There were some lovely views from in front of the gallery.

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The gallery was very big and contained nearly all Hungarian artists' work; 20th century and 19th century paintings, medieval Gothic painted wooden altars, 20th century graphic art including posters, some very old stone carvings/ inscriptions on loan from the National Museum, nude stone sculptures from the 20th century and more. Photos weren't allowed, so I only managed to get one or two.

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When I left the gallery I found that it was a little bit cooler and raindrops were just starting to fall. It was still warm and humid though - just a little less hot than before. I power walked to some shelter beneath a tree and arrived just as the rain got harder. More people joined me and then the wind suddenly picked up and the rain became torrential. The wind started blowing the toilet assistant's outdoor ticket desk across the courtyard so I and one or two others stopped it for her; we then made a run for the toilet to take cover, as the tree no longer provided any shelter.

After twenty minutes or so the rain died down a bit, so I made my way up the stairs and into the funicular building. I travelled down the hill in it, with three other people. Just as we got to the bottom the rain became torrential again... and then ice started hitting the windows! The biggest hailstones I've ever seen. One of the last things I expected to see in August... we remained in the funicular carriage for about twenty minutes before making a run for the entrance/ exit building. There I remained for another decent period of time until the hail and rain died down. Eventually I left and crossed the bridge - the sun had now come out.

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After getting some money out I stopped at Aldi to buy something to cook for dinner. I chose some gnocchi and a jar of bolognese sauce - quick and easy; I was knackered and my legs were hurting, so I didn't want to stand up for any longer than strictly necessary.

Posted by 3Traveller 14:56 Archived in Hungary Tagged art budapest museum hungary funicular fortifications river_danube extreme_weather Comments (0)

Bucharest

Bucharest


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Bucharest was incredibly hot and humid, almost at Guayaquil levels, but very interesting.

First of all I had fun exploring the old town, passing through University Square on the way.

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There was no free breakfast at the hostel, so I visited a bakery instead and ate the result (a small savoury pastry sprinkled with poppy seeds and filled with bacon and melted cheese) next to a small statue of Romulus and Remus being fed by the wolf.

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Then I came across the Old Princely Court, some remains of a palace used and extended by Vlad the Impaler, who as it happens was born in Sighisoara, my next destination after Bucharest.

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First of all I went underground into the brick cellars - it was interesting, with the bonus of being deliciously cool - and then I looked round the rest.

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This included the accompanying church - originally built in 1559, but much-restored since then. The Romanian Orthodox Church seems to differ from the Bulgarian in that the candle-stands are actually boxes and are outside in a separate area. I bought and lit a candle for Dad, and after I'd done so a woman came up to me, pressed two small packets of biscuits and two boiled sweets into my hands, said something in Romanian and walked away! She did the same with another woman, who hadn't lit any candles yet.

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The old town also contained the old and beautiful Stavropoleos Church. It was covered in frescoes on the inside and I had fun finding out the names of the saints in them via transliteration. It seems that Romanian used to use the Cyrillic alphabet.

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I also loved its pretty, peaceful little courtyard, where I stopped to sit down and have a cold drink.

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The old town was definitely well worth looking round.

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Last of all I visited the National History Museum, which was great. Special mention to the anthropomorphic pottery, the stuffed wild boar, the exquisite metalwork from 5th - 3rd century BC (helmets, cow head-shaped drinking horn, diadem of gold leaves and fish-shaped silver harness appliques) and the 14th - 16th century weapons.

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After a rest back at the hostel, during which I had two more savoury pastries for a late lunch, followed the Ashes cricket live updates for a while and caught Kate online for a bit, I headed back out. My destination was the cemetery where Nicolae and Elena Ceaușescu are buried, but on the way I stopped for a bit outside the infamous Palace of the Parliament. It was built on the orders of Ceaușescu and is the second largest building in the world (the Pentagon is the largest). A large part of the original city centre was wiped out to accommodate it.

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I found the cemetery OK, but it took much longer than I expected to walk there, so by the time I arrived at was nearly 19.30; it was supposed to close at 20.00. After spending about twenty minutes unsuccessfully looking for their graves, I had to give up and walk all the way back again. Although I knew which row and number their graves were, the numbers of the rows didn't seem to follow any particular order, and lots of the rows didn't have any number at all. It was quite maze-like and to be honest looking for the right graves was a bit like looking for a needle in a haystack! I'm still glad I went though, because it was interesting to see what a Romanian cemetery is like. Nearly all of the gravestones were shaped like crosses and were made of very white stone; there were some small mausoleums as well. I noticed lots of inlaid circular photos or pictures of the dead, like on the stones in the courtyards of the monasteries I've seen in Bulgaria. Outside the cemetery entrance there were lots of flower and coffin sellers with their wares on display at the side of the pavement.

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Instead of going straight back to the hostel, I made a diversion to an area of town I hadn't been to before, in order to have dinner at a restaurant I'd been recommended. I regretted it before I even got there, because I was so knackered (it was quite a long diversion) and as soon as I got there and saw a different restaurant there, I regretted it even more. It looked a bit posh and I was in not the cleanest of clothes and was literally dripping with sweat. Normally I would have just gone in anyway, but I was practically on my last legs by now and decided on the spur of the moment just to go in the nearest supermarket instead. I bought a pasta salad and a custard-like chocolate pudding, plus drinks, and tottered home. I knew that if I sat down for dinner at the restaurant, I wouldn't be able to get up again!

Posted by 3Traveller 08:57 Archived in Romania Tagged art palace cemetery museum hostel romania dad bucharest orthodox_church romanian_cuisine extreme_weather Comments (0)

UNESCO World Heritage Site: Pamukkale and Ancient Hierapolis

Pamukkale, Ancient Hierapolis and Selçuk


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Day trip today to the dazzling white hot spring terraces of Pamukkale and the ancient site of Hierapolis.

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It turned out to be one of the busiest days of the year - a feast day for the end of Ramadan, all historic and tourist sites in the country were free entry for Turkish nationals. The place was packed, but I was still very glad we'd come. It's a UNESCO World Heritage Site for a reason, after all - it is both spectacular, otherworldly and historically significant. I remembered seeing pictures of the terraces somewhere years and years ago (in childhood or teenage years), without knowing where they were or what they were called, and being transfixed. I imagined what a wonderful thing it would be to visit such a magical place.... it was only recently, when I was in Bulgaria and reading about Turkey, that I came across pictures of Pamukkale again and things clicked into place... here was my magical landscape again; this time a reality to visit!

We walked round Hierapolis first, a very open site with fantastic views of the landscape reaching up to mountains in the distance. Hierapolis was an ancient city within the Classical region of Phrygia. There were remarkably few people here considering the huge amounts around the mineral terraces next door. Very peaceful and pleasant, highlights being a restored theatre and the Nymphaeum Temple.

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The terraces themselves - well, what can I say! The stretches of white calcium carbonate reminded me (and surely most other people) of a glacier; the pools of light turquoise water, filled from hot springs and clouded with minerals, were a sight to behold. So surreal! First of all we walked around, looking at all the terraces people aren't allowed to touch...

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...before moving along to the ones which people are allowed to paddle and bathe in. I wished I had a swimming costume available so I could bathe, but as neither Dave nor I had any swimming stuff with us, we made do with a paddle. I saw one guy walk out of a pool with white mineral silt spread all over his face, chest and arms. Not a bad place to give yourself a facepack!

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It was an exceedingly hot day and by the time we had to leave the terraces we had finished the drinks we'd brought with us. We were so thirsty that although the drinks at the stands outside the exit were expensive, I had no choice but to buy a couple there.

Back in Selçuk in the evening, we had another delicious dinner next to the Roman aqueduct. We returned to the restaurant we'd eaten at the day before yesterday - the owner recognised us from before and was really friendly. While we ate we watched the storks on the aqueduct and noted all the cats and kittens that were wandering around the tables. One table near us had six or seven of them!

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After dinner we walked around the base of the aqueduct, hoping to get a photo of one or more of the storks taking flight from the nests on top, but with no luck. We also admired the view of the Basilica of St John on the hill on the other side of town.

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Posted by 3Traveller 06:38 Archived in Turkey Tagged turkey dave storks selcuk pamukkale natural_wonder hierapolis roman_remains unesco_world_heritage_site thermal_baths extreme_weather Comments (0)

Lunch with a view

Veliko Tarnovo


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I was teaching in the morning and I thought Mum was going back to the fruit & vegetable market while I was gone, but when I arrived back I found her just finishing off deep cleaning my bathroom! She hadn't gone to the market after all.

After a while we headed out to lunch at a place I had not taken any visitors to before. It's a little restaurant/ café down a set of steps off the main road; we ate on the wooden balcony with a fantastic view of the sword monument hill and around. This time Mum had pepper burek and salad, while I had mishmash and chips. Mishmash is a mixture of scrambled egg, crumbled up white cheese and chopped up and cooked peppers and tomatoes. It was fantastic; I could tell the ingredients were ultra fresh.

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It was still sunny at this point, but after walking across the bridge to the sword monument, it started raining. Typical! Neither of us had brought our umbrellas. Oh well, it was still nice to look round and get the views of the houses on the hillside opposite. We spotted the balcony where we'd just had lunch. No snakes to be seen this time, though some small lizards skittered about.

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From there we moved on to the supermarket. When we came out of there the rain was hammering down, so we went back inside for a bit until it had subsided a little. We started walking back, but then decided to get a taxi to save us getting completely soaked.

After an hour or two of rest, we went out again, this time to the craftsmen's street but via historic Gurko Street. The sun had come out again by now. I left Mum in the craftsmen's street as I had to go back to work.

When I got back from work at about 9.50pm, Mum had dinner ready! Flattened meatballs with a vegetable sauce and some of the seafood-shaped pasta Kate had given me for my birthday. For pudding we had an 'Eton mess' but made with tinned mandarins instead of strawberries.

Posted by 3Traveller 23:55 Archived in Bulgaria Tagged lizards bulgaria mum veliko_tarnovo bulgarian_cuisine gurko_street assen_monument extreme_weather Comments (0)

Spectacular thunderstorm

Bozhentsi and Veliko Tarnovo


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Bozhentsi has very similar architecture to Tryavna, complete with slate roofs. We walked round the village for around 45 minutes before having some dinner - for me, tarator and some stewed rabbit with potatoes and vegetables. It was past 9 o'clock by the time we finished.

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It had been hot and sunny most of the day, but about an hour after we got back to Veliko Tarnovo a thunderstorm hit us. I've never seen so much lightning before! I just stood at my bedroom windows and watched both sheet and forked lightning strike the hills opposite. It was well after dark by now so every time lightning flashed, for a split second it lit up everything within my panoramic viewpoint. Some went dangerously close to the village of Arbanasi - I hope they were OK.

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Posted by 3Traveller 06:15 Archived in Bulgaria Tagged bulgaria veliko_tarnovo bulgarian_cuisine extreme_weather Comments (0)

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