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Typical day for me in Veliko Tarnovo

Veliko Tarnovo


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I just thought I'd write a bit about what a typical working day is like for me here in Veliko Tarnovo.

Once I'm up and about I look out of the windows at one of the spectacular views you can imagine and think about how lucky I am to have it. Since it's winter, I eat my breakfast beneath the warm air blowing out of the heater on the wall near the ceiling. I walk to work in joggers and trainers because they are more comfortable than the work trousers and shoes I change into once I arrive at work.

For the last couple of weeks it's been very misty every morning; this morning is no exception.

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Sometimes the mist is so heavy I can't even see the hill directly opposite my windows, or the River Yantra, or Tsarevets Fortress on the hill on my right hand side. Everything beyond the road running above the Yantra but below my windows is completely blanked out. Sometimes most of the Fortress is shrouded in mist, with only the Patriarchate Tower rising above it. On other occasions, the mist has lessened, so that the Yantra and the Fortress and the hill opposite can be seen but the hills and enscarpments beyond them either cannot be seen at all, or they move in and out of sight as the fingers of cloud drift by.

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Sometimes as I step outside and turn to double lock the outer door, one of the local street dogs trots up to say hello. She doesn't officially belong to anyone but is fed by several people in the neighbourhood. I stroke her and say hello before walking down a steep set of steps to the main street. Sometimes she trots along with me for a while before continuing along the main road into town; I soon leave the main road and go down two more steep sets of steps onto Gurko Street. The dramatically hilly nature of Veliko Tarnovo means that steps and slopes are everywhere.

I often smell the aroma of woodsmoke around Veliko Tarnovo, unsurprisingly given the fact that the vast majority of people have wood burners; the school's radiators are powered by one. On this typical day, I smell woodsmoke on my walk along Gurko Street to school; I see that one of the houses has just received a delivery of chopped wood. The view from this side of the hill is also fantastic. The many cats and kittens that spend their time on Gurko Street look at me when I pass by. Two or three street cleaners in bright orange uniforms appear and begin sweeping up leaves and any rubbish with straw brooms. Sometimes a rubbish truck squeezes through the street, passers-by like myself stepping aside to let it pass.

When the weather is wet I nip from beneath overhanging building to overhanging building, sheltering from as much rain as I can but avoiding the streams of water that flow from the pipes and guttering above; but recently the weather has been misty and cold but dry - the only water in the open air on Gurko Street has been the water flowing into stone sinks set into the hillside side of the road. The water is clear; maybe originally the sinks and water supply was the residents' main water source? Occasionally I see residents fill up buckets from them. Maybe the sinks were there before cars became common, meaning that horses used to drink from them. I know that in the Bulgarian villages, some people travel by horse and cart.

Sometimes I hear church bells ringing in the distance; this always reminds me of my walk to work in Guayaquil in my last three weeks of the job in Ecuador. I had an IELTS one-to-one between 7 - 9 am from Monday to Friday, so I'd set off from my new flat about 6.20. At 6.30 every morning, just as I was walking through Urdesa Norte neighbourhood and nearing the river, I'd hear a church bell clanging nearby. Then, as I crossed the river, I'd sometimes spot an iguana or two in the trees or on the brick wall to one side.

Once I've reached work I get changed and prepare for my first lesson. My exact teaching timetable is different every day of the working week, but I always have at least one or two classes in the morning, afternoon and in the evening, except for Tuesday when I don't have any evening classes. The average number is about five classes a day; most classes are an hour and a half long, but some are an hour and one of mine is only 45 minutes.

For lunch I usually nip out to a shop and get a bottle of Coke Zero, a couple of cheesy rolls and a clear plastic box of sweet things to eat in front of the computer at work. I save one of the rolls and about half of the sweet things for later. Bulgaria seems to have quite a large collection of different types of cheesy rolls. Some with yellow cheese on top (kashkavalki), or variously-shaped ones with white cheese (a lot like feta) inside and on top. The sweet things I normally get are balls of a brown, moist, sweet stuff, rolled in dessicated coconut. I've never quite worked out what exactly is in them apart from coconut, but they're delicious! Another type of sweet thing I get sometimes are a bit like little circular meringues, but chewier and nuttier, a little bit biscuit-like. Sometimes, if I have enough time, instead of buying cheesy rolls, I go to the deli round the corner and have a plate of hot food - normally stuffed aubergine or stuffed courgettes - and a little plate of créme caramel or rice pudding.

Then it's time for afternoon and evening classes, interspersed with planning, marking, topping up the fire in the heater with pieces of wood, chatting and going on the internet to check my email and Facebook, check various sports scores, read articles on BBC Sport and BBC News and play games on Sporcle. The amount of time I get for lunch varies and sometimes I don't get a chance to have it until mid-afternoon.

On Mondays and Wednesdays I don't finish work until 9.30 pm, so I don't bother cooking anything for dinner, unless on Monday I can just reheat a portion of something I'd made at the weekend. At weekends it's a different story - I usually make the effort to do some proper cooking.

On more than one occasion in the late evening I hear the almost-unmistakeable sound of a train passing through Veliko Tarnovo. It's not unpleasant at all - it's a very low, rhythmical rumble. I say 'almost' unmistakeable because I remember on my first few days in VT I couldn't work out what the sound was - I thought it sounded a bit like a group of people beating drums in the distance. I thought that maybe there was some kind of parade going on, even though I couldn't see signs of any such thing when I looked out of the window. Eventually I realised what it was, however!

That reminds of my first couple of weeks in Ecuador, when I thought that the tune the rubbish truck made on its rounds was actually a theme tune from a television programme I seemed to hear people watching all the time. It was only until I heard it properly for the first time (starting up in the distance, becoming louder and louder before fading away again) that I realised what the sound actually was!

Posted by 3Traveller 02:10 Archived in Bulgaria Tagged trains bulgaria ecuador veliko_tarnovo english_teaching bulgarian_cuisine gurko_street

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